Chapter 1

Page 9

It is through the shareholder that society sanctions what the company wishes to do.  Society says, “Yes, you may do that,” when money is invested in a company.  Perhaps the principal difference between a free and socialist economy is the mechanism by which this social assent or commitment is made.  In a controlled economy, a …

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Page 8

The market will also balance short-term against long-term considerations in the same way that the employees and shareholders make such considerations.  If the market does not get its needs satisfied in one way, it will seek alternative ways.  This is the same as saying that the market invests or commits its need to a particular …

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Page 7

So much so is this the case that financial analysts, who are the counterpart of employment placement centers, are sometimes called upon for assistance to make the move easier.  Management is passing into the hands of professional managers; likewise financial investment is passing to an increasing degree into the hands of professional investors, and a …

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Page 5

Will is the urge in everything toward self-actualization.  Everything is pressing out toward being itself to the fullest.  Everything seeks to express itself.  This self-expression rises through interaction of what we shall call structure and process.  It also arises through two trends: one toward the center and the other toward the periphery; one toward greater …

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Page 4

In industry, “growth” commonly means but one things: to get bigger.  Success is equated with size, rationalized as economy of scale, and projected as a national faith through the G.N.P. index.  Hollywood, Broadway, General Motors, and more recently the conglomerates are the result.  A balloon, as it is blown up, gets bigger–but this is not …

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Page 3

Classical organization theory suggests that there is “the company” and that there is “change,” and these two are in some way in opposition.  Monolithic organizations have been set up with the view that the company acquires significance through its stability.  Emphasis has been put on the hierarchical structuring, and a tendency toward “power structuring” has …

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Chapter 1–Page 2

Page 2 ~ In addition to job description and organization charts in a company, there are other elements such as budgets, forms, appraisal systems, systems for introducing new products to the company, salary-administration systems, long-range forecasts, management-development systems, goal-setting systems, data-processing systems, and management-information systems.  All are developed independently with very little integration and frequently …

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Shareholder, Employee, Customer: The Basic Triad

A company is a multidimensional system capable of growth, expansion, and self-regulation.  It is, therefore, not a thing, but a set of interacting forces.  Any theory of organiztion must be capable of reflecting a company’s many facets, its dynamism, and its basic orderliness.  When a company organization is reviewed, or when reorganizing a company, it …

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